Checking Travel History for Green Card Holders

If you’re a green card holder, it’s important to keep track of your travel history. Here’s how to do it.

Checkout this video:

What is a Green Card?

A Green Card is an identification card that proves that a person is a legal permanent resident of the United States. Green Card holders are authorized to live and work in the United States indefinitely. They can also apply for U.S. citizenship after five years of continuous residence in the country.

How do I check my travel history for a Green Card?

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has a searchable database of Records of Arrival and Departure (Entry/Exit Records). These records contain information about foreign nationals who have been admitted or paroled into the United States, or who have departed the United States.

To obtain a copy of your travel history (also called an I-94 record), you will need to submit a request to CBP. You can do this online, by mail, or in person at a CBP DEFerred Inspection Site. There is no fee for this service.

Online: You can use the I-94 website to get your most recent I-94 record or to request a travel history for a specific time period.

By Mail: You can request your travel history by mail by sending a completed Form I-867P, Record of Arrival and Departure, to the address listed on the form.

In Person: You can go in person to a CBP Deferred Inspection Site and request a copy of your travel history from an officer there.

What if I can’t find my travel history?

If you can’t find your travel history, don’t worry. There are a few things you can do to try to get it.

First, check with the airline or airlines you’ve flown with in the past. They should have records of your travel. If you’ve flown with multiple airlines, you may need to contact each one individually.

You can also try contacting the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). They may have records of your travel if you’ve entered the country through one of their ports of entry.

If you still can’t find your travel history, don’t worry. You can provide other documentation to show that you meet the requirements for a green card. This could include things like rental agreements, utility bills, bank statements, and more.

What if I have lost my Green Card?

If you have lost your Green Card, you may be able to obtain a replacement from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). You will need to submit a replacement request along with proof of your identity and citizenship. If your Green Card was stolen, you should also file a police report.

How do I renew my Green Card?

If you are a permanent resident (Green Card holder), you should carry your Green Card with you at all times.

You will need to renew your Green Card every 10 years, unless you receive a notice from USCIS telling you that it has been extended for longer. You can renew your Green Card by mail or in person at a USCIS office.

To renew your Green Card by mail, you will need to fill out Form I-90 and send it to the address on the form. You will also need to include a photograph and the filing fee.

To renew your Green Card in person, you will need to make an appointment with a USCIS office and bring Form I-90, a photograph, and the filing fee.

What are the benefits of having a Green Card?

The main benefit of having a Green Card is that it allows you to live and work permanently in the United States. It also gives you the opportunity to apply for U.S. citizenship, if you meet certain requirements. Other benefits of having a Green Card include:
-You can travel freely in and out of the United States, as long as you do not stay outside of the country for more than one year at a time.
-You can apply for a driver’s license and other government-issued identification cards.
-You can apply for Social Security benefits, if you are eligible.
-You can apply for federally funded benefits, such as food stamps and Medicaid (health insurance for low-income people).
-You can sponsor certain family members to come to the United States on a Green Card of their own.

What are the requirements for a Green Card?

To be eligible for a Green Card, you must meet certain requirements set by the U.S. government. If you are applying for a Green Card through employment, you must have a job offer from a U.S. employer. If you are applying for a Green Card through family, you must have a close relative who is a U.S. citizen or Green Card holder. You can also apply for a Green Card through refugee or asylee status, or by winning the Diversity Visa Lottery.

There are also several bars to eligibility that could make you ineligible for a Green Card. These include having certain communicable diseases, having a criminal record, being likely to become a “public charge” (i.e., relying on the government for assistance), and being subject to certain statues such as the Child Status Protection Act. In addition, if you have been previously removed from the United States or have illegally entered the country, you may be ineligible for a Green Card.

It is important to Note that even if you meet all of the above requirements, there is no guarantee that you will be issued a Green Card. The final decision is up to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

How do I apply for a Green Card?

To apply for a Green Card, you will need to submit a Green Card Application Form. The application process can vary depending on your eligibility and whether you are applying for a Green Card through family, employment, or another category.

If you are applying for a Green Card through employment, you will first need to obtain an offer of employment from a U.S. employer. Once you have an offer of employment, your employer will begin the process by filing a Labor Condition Application with the Department of Labor. After the Department of Labor approves the Labor Condition Application, your employer will file an Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. If your Immigrant Petition is approved, you will then need to file an Application for Adjustment of Status or obtain an immigrant visa through consular processing.

If you are applying for a Green Card through family, you will need to have a family member who is a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident sponsoring you for immigration. Your sponsor will need to file an Immigrant Petition for Alien Relative with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services on your behalf. If the petition is approved, you will then need to file an Application for Adjustment of Status or obtain an immigrant visa through consular processing.

Other categories of individuals who may be eligible to apply for a Green Card include refugees and asylees, victims of human trafficking and other crimes, and participants in certain humanitarian programs.

What is the process for getting a Green Card?

The process for getting a Green Card is as follows: first, you must have your fingerprints and photo taken; next, you will submit an immigration application; then, you will have an interview with an immigration officer; finally, you will be issued a Green Card.

How long does it take to get a Green Card?

The time it takes to get a Green Card depends on the category under which you applied, your country of origin, and your particular circumstances.

The U.S. State Department’s Visa Bulletin provides information on waiting times for people who apply for Green Cards in different categories. You can also check the processing times for your nearest USCIS office on their website. It usually takes longer to get a Green Card if you applied under a family-based category, as there is usually a backlog of petitions. If you are from a country with a large number of applicants, you may also have to wait longer.

There are four main categories of Green Card: family-based, employment-based, refugee or asylee status, and the diversity visa lottery program. You will likely have to wait longest if you applied through the employment-based Green Card category, as there are annual quotas for each country. In general, it will take around two years to get a Green Card if you applied through this category.

If you have been approved for a Green Card, you will receive a packet of information from USCIS that includes your Alien Registration Receipt Card (Green Card). It is important to keep this card with you at all times as it is proof of your legal status in the United States. If you lose your card or it is stolen, you should contact USCIS immediately so that they can issue you a new one.

Scroll to Top