Traveling to Taiwan as a Chinese Green Card Holder

Traveling to Taiwan as a Chinese Green Card Holder? Here are some things you need to know before you go!

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Applying for a travel visa

As a Chinese green card holder, you will need to apply for a travel visa before you can enter Taiwan. The application process is relatively simple, but there are a few things you need to know before you get started.

First, you will need to have a valid passport and green card. Next, you will need to fill out an application form and submit it along with two passport-sized photos. Once your application has been processed, you will be issued a travel visa which will allow you to stay in Taiwan for up to 90 days.

Please note that if you plan to stay in Taiwan for longer than 90 days, you will need to apply for an extension at least 30 days before your visa expires.

What to expect when traveling to Taiwan

As a Chinese green card holder, you may travel to Taiwan for business or pleasure without a visa for stays of up to 90 days. However, you will need to present your green card and a valid passport at immigration. If you plan to stay longer than 90 days or engage in activities other than tourism or business (such as work, study, or journalism), you will need to obtain the appropriate visa from a Taiwanese embassy or consulate before your trip.

Tips for traveling to Taiwan

Although relations between Taiwan and China have improved in recent years, there are still some important things to keep in mind if you are planning to travel from China to Taiwan as a Chinese green card holder. Here are a few tips to help make your trip go smoothly:

– Make sure you have a valid passport and Chinese visa. You will need to apply for a Taiwanese visa at a Taiwanese consulate or embassy before traveling.
– Familiarize yourself with the customs regulations of both countries. There are some restrictions on what you can bring into Taiwan, so be sure to check the latest information before packing your bags.
– Learn some basic Mandarin or Taiwanese. Although English is widely spoken in Taiwan, knowing some of the local language will make your trip more enjoyable and can come in handy if you need to ask for directions or order food.
– Know your currency exchange options. Taiwanese currency is not freely convertible, so you will need to plan ahead if you want to change Chinese Yuan into Taiwanese Dollars.
– Research your accommodation options. There are a variety of hotels, hostels, and guesthouses available in Taiwan, so be sure to shop around for the best price and location for your needs.

following these tips will help ensure that your trip to Taiwan is safe, enjoyable, and hassle-free!

What to see and do in Taiwan

As a Chinese green card holder, you are able to travel to Taiwan without a visa and stay for up to 90 days. You will need to have a valid passport, as well as your green card. While in Taiwan, there are a few things that you should do and see.

One of the places that you should visit is Taipei 101. This is one of the tallest buildings in the world and has a great observation deck that you can go to for a small fee. Another place that you should visit is Taroko National Park. This park is full of hiking trails, marble canyons, and scenic outlooks. You can also visit hot springs, temples, and museums while in Taiwan.

When it comes to food, you should try some of the local specialties such as beef noodles, stinky tofu, bubble tea, and oyster omelets. Taiwanese food is known for being delicious and fairly inexpensive. You can find street food vendors all over the country selling these specialties.

Overall, Taiwan is a great place to visit as a Chinese green card holder. There are plenty of things to do and see throughout the country. Be sure to add Taipei 101 and Taroko National Park to your list of places to visit!

Taiwanese culture and customs

As a Chinese green card holder, you may be familiar with Chinese culture and customs. However, Taiwan has its own unique culture and customs that you may not be familiar with. Here are some things to keep in mind when traveling to Taiwan:

· Taiwanese people are very friendly and hospitable. They may go out of their way to help you if they see you struggling with something.

· Taiwanese culture is a blend of Chinese and Japanese influences. You will see this in the food, architecture, and even the way people dress.

· Taiwanese people are very proud of their country and its accomplishments. They may be quick to correct you if they think you are wrong about something related to Taiwan.

· Religion is an important part of Taiwanese culture. Over half of the population identify as Buddhist, but there is also a significant number of Taoists and Confucians. You will see temples and shrines throughout the country, and many people follow religious traditions and practices in their everyday lives.

Taiwanese food and cuisine

Taiwanese food is a unique blend of Chinese, Japanese, and Taiwanese influences. The island’s diverse climate and geography also play a role in the local cuisine. Typical Taiwanese dishes include rice, noodles, soy products, pork, chicken, beef, and fish. Vegetables and fruits are also widely used in Taiwanese cooking.

Taiwan is also home to a variety of unique snacks and desserts. Street food is particularly popular on the island, and visitors will find an abundance of small stalls and carts selling everything from dumplings to popcorn chicken. Taiwanese cuisine is renowned for its use of fresh ingredients and unique flavor combinations. So if you’re looking for something new to try on your next trip to Taiwan, be sure to sample some of the local food!

Where to stay in Taiwan

As a Chinese green card holder, you have the option to stay in Taiwan for either leisure or business purposes. You can apply for a Taiwan visa at any of their Diplomatic Missions. If you are staying for less than 30 days, you do not need a visa. If you are staying for more than 30 days, you will need to apply for a residence permit. For more information on visas and residence permits, please visit the website of the Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of China (Taiwan).

There are many accommodation options available in Taiwan, from hostels and hotels to apartments and homestays. The type of accommodation you choose will depend on your budget, how long you plan to stay in Taiwan, and your preferred location. Hostels and hotels are usually more expensive than apartments and homestays, but they offer more amenities and facilities. Apartments and homestays are usually more affordable, but they may not have as many amenities and facilities as hostels and hotels.

When choosing accommodation in Taiwan, it is important to consider your budget, preferred location, and length of stay. Hostels and hotels are usually more expensive but offer more amenities, while apartments and homestays are usually more affordable but may not have as many amenities.

Getting around Taiwan

As a Chinese green card holder, you are able to travel to Taiwan visa-free for up to 30 days. Within that time frame, you are able to use any form of transportation to get around the island, including bus, train, plane, or car.

Weather and climate in Taiwan

Taiwan is an island country located in East Asia. It has a subtropical climate and is affected by the monsoon winds from the southeast Asia. The weather is generally mild, but can be very hot and humid during the summer months. The best time to visit Taiwan is during the spring or autumn, when the weather is more comfortable.

Safety and security in Taiwan

Taiwan is a safe place to travel, but there are a few things to be aware of.

As a Chinese green card holder, you may be subject to different entry requirements than other travelers. Make sure to check with the Taiwanese embassy or consulate before you travel.

Once in Taiwan, be aware of your surroundings and take precautions when travelling alone or in unfamiliar areas. Use common sense and trust your instincts – if something doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t.

Keep your belongings close to you at all times, especially in busy tourist areas. Avoid carrying large amounts of cash or wearing expensive jewelry. Be alert for pickpockets and purse-snatchers, especially in crowded areas like markets or public transportation.

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