The Green New Deal: Does It Ban Air Travel?

The Green New Deal: Does It Ban Air Travel? – Recently, the Green New Deal (GND) has been making headlines. The non-binding resolution, proposed by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Edward Markey, calls for a 10-year plan to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions.

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Introduction

As the economic, social, and environmental costs of oil and gas become increasingly clear, a number of policy proposals have been put forward to shift the United States away from its reliance on fossil fuels. The most well-known of these is the Green New Deal (GND), a set of proposed policies that aims to transform the U.S. economy in order to combat climate change.

The GND has been praised by some as an ambitious and necessary plan to address the climate crisis, while others have criticized it as being too expensive and unrealistic. One common area of criticism is the perception that the GND would ban air travel. In this article, we’ll explore whether there is any truth to this claim.

What is the Green New Deal?

The Green New Deal is a broad resolution that was introduced by Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ed Markey in February 2019. The resolution calls for a 10-year national mobilization to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions and create millions of high-wage jobs.

The goals of the Green New Deal are ambitious, and many of the proposed policies would have far-reaching impacts on sectors of the economy beyond the energy sector. One such policy is a ban on domestic air travel, which has led some to question whether the Green New Deal would make air travel illegal.

Currently, there is no language in the Green New Deal resolution that specifically mentions air travel. However, the resolution does call for the promotion of clean, affordable, and accessible transportation options, which could be interpreted to include a ban on domestic air travel.

Whether or not the Green New Deal would ban air travel is still up for debate, but it is clear that the resolution would have major implications for the airline industry if it were to be passed into law.

What Does the Green New Deal Include?

The Green New Deal is a resolution that was introduced by Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Edward J. Markey in February 2019. The resolution called for a set of economic stimulus programs to be implemented in order to combat climate change. These programs included investing in renewable energy, upgrading infrastructure, and improving energy efficiency.

While the resolution did not explicitly ban air travel, it did call for reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero by 2050. This would likely require a significant reduction in air travel, as the transportation sector is responsible for 14 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.

The Green New Deal has been praised by some as an ambitious plan to address climate change, and criticized by others as being unrealistic and too costly.

Does the Green New Deal Ban Air Travel?

As part of the Green New Deal resolution put forth by Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, some have questioned whether air travel may eventually be banned under the proposed plan.

In order to achieve the goals of the Green New Deal, which include reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero by 2030, it is possible that air travel may need to be limited. However, the resolution itself does not explicitly call for a ban on air travel.

While it is still unclear how exactly the goals of the Green New Deal will be accomplished, limiting air travel is one potential way to reduce emissions from the transportation sector.

Why Would the Green New Deal Ban Air Travel?

One of the most controversial aspects of the Green New Deal is the implication that it would ban air travel. The resolution itself does not mention air travel specifically, but it does call for a reduction in emissions from the transportation sector “to net-zero by 2050.”

Critics of the Green New Deal say that this target is impossible to achieve without banning air travel, or at least reducing it dramatically. They point to the fact that aviation accounts for about 2 percent of global emissions, and growing. They also argue that there are no known technologies that can make flying zero-emission in the next 30 years.

Supporters of the Green New Deal contend that the resolution does not explicitly call for a ban on air travel and say that critics are overstating its implications. They argue that the target of net-zero emissions by 2050 is ambitious but achievable, and point to technological advances in electric vehicles and renewable energy as proof that we can decarbonize the transportation sector.

The truth is that we don’t know for sure whether the Green New Deal would ban air travel or not. What we do know is that it would be an ambitious goal to achieve net-zero emissions from the transportation sector by 2050. Whether it’s possible remains to be seen.

What Are the Implications of Banning Air Travel?

The Green New Deal, a set of policies proposed by Democrats in the US Congress, has been the subject of much debate. One of the most controversial aspects of the Green New Deal is its potential implications for air travel.

Some proponents of the Green New Deal have called for a ban on air travel, arguing that it is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. However, other environmentalists have cautioned against such a ban, arguing that it would be impractical and would disproportionately impact low-income people and communities of color.

There is no clear consensus on what the implications of banning air travel would be. Critics argue that a ban would be difficult to implement and would have negative economic consequences, while supporters argue that it would be necessary to avert climate disaster. The truth is that the implications of a ban on air travel are complex and unsure.

What Are the Alternatives to Air Travel?

The Green New Deal does not specifically ban air travel, but it does set goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. There are a number of alternative forms of travel that emitted fewer greenhouse gases, including:

-Rail travel: Trains are a more energy-efficient form of travel than planes and emit far fewer greenhouse gases per passenger-mile.

-Electric cars: Electric cars are becoming increasingly popular and efficient, and they produce no emissions.

-Bicycles: Bicycles are the most efficient form of transportation, and they produce zero emissions.

-Walking: Walking is the simplest form of transportation, and it emits no emissions.

What Is the Future of Air Travel?

The Green New Deal is a set of proposed economic stimulus programs in the United States that aims to address climate change and economic inequality.

One of the most controversial aspects of the Green New Deal is its potential impact on air travel. The resolution does not explicitly ban air travel, but it does call for ‘reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation’ to ‘net-zero’ by 2050.

That means that, if the goals of the Green New Deal are met, air travel would have to become either emissions-free or offset its emissions through other means, such as planting trees.

There are a number of ways to make air travel more sustainable, including electric planes, biofuels, and more efficient engines. However, some experts believe that the only way to meet the ambitious goals of the Green New Deal is to reduce demand for air travel through measures such as a frequent flyer tax or a decrease in the number of airports.

What do you think? Is reducing demand for air travel necessary to meet the goals of the Green New Deal? Or can technological innovation make flying sustainable?

Conclusion

Airlines are some of the biggest polluters in the world. The aviation industry is responsible for around 2% of all human-caused carbon dioxide emissions, and those emissions are growing fast. If we’re going to meet the goals of the Green New Deal—to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030—we’ll need to find a way to make air travel much cleaner and more efficient.

That’s why many people were surprised to see that the text of the Green New Deal resolution does not mention air travel specifically. Some critics have even claimed that the omission means that the Green New Deal would ban air travel.

So what’s really going on here? Does the Green New Deal ban air travel?

The answer is no, the Green New Deal does not ban air travel. The resolution mentions transportation a few times, but it mainly focuses on electrifying ground transportation, such as cars and trucks. There is no mention of airplanes or flying in the resolution.

That doesn’t mean that the aviation industry will be unaffected by the goals of the Green New Deal. Achieving net-zero emissions by 2030 will be a huge challenge for every sector, and the aviation industry will need to find ways to reduce its emissions significantly in order to meet that goal. But there is no specific mention of air travel in the Green New Deal resolution, and no indication that it would be banned under the plan.

Works Cited

-https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2019/2/7/18215598/green-new-deal-text-frequently-asked-questions
-https://www.politico.com/agenda/story/2019/02/07/green-new-deal-111133
-“The Green New Deal.” Frequently Asked Questions, 7 Feb. 2019, www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2019/2/7/18215598/green-new-deal

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