Does Trump’s Travel Ban Stop Green Card Holders?

Trump’s travel ban has left many green card holders stranded outside the United States. Learn what you can do if you’re affected by the ban.

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Introduction

The Trump administration’s travel ban has been one of the most controversial and disputed executive orders in recent memory. The policy, which temporarily bars citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States, has been repeatedly challenged in court and sparked mass protests across the country.

One of the groups most affected by the travel ban are green card holders, who are legal permanent residents of the United States. While the ban does not explicitly target green card holders, it has made it much more difficult for them to travel to and from the countries affected by the ban.

In this article, we’ll take a look at how the travel ban affects green card holders and what options they have for traveling to and from the countries affected by the ban.

What is the travel ban?

The travel ban is a policy that was put in place by the Trump administration. It restricts travel from certain countries, most of which are Muslim-majority nations. It has been revised several times, and the latest version applies to citizens of Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad and North Korea. It also affects certain Venezuelan government officials and their families.

The ban has been widely criticized as being Islamophobic and unconstitutional. It has been challenged in court several times, but it was upheld by the Supreme Court in June 2018.

Green card holders are legal permanent residents of the United States. They are not affected by the travel ban.

Who is affected by the travel ban?

The Executive Order that President Trump signed on January 27, 2017, temporarily suspends entry into the United States of foreign nationals from seven countries. The seven countries are: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

The order also suspends the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) for 120 days. It reduces the number of refugees the United States will admit in Fiscal Year 2017 to 50,000, down from the 110,000 ceiling set by the Obama Administration.

Nationals of the seven countries who were in the United States on January 27, 2017 (irrespective of whether they had a valid visa or not), and who have not been physically present in the United States since then are not affected by this Executive Order.

Why was the travel ban put in place?

The Trump administration has said the travel ban is necessary to protect the United States from terrorist attacks. The administration has also said that the ban is not aimed at Muslims, but at countries that pose a threat to the United States.

The travel ban applies to citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. It also suspends the U.S. refugee program for 120 days.

The ban has been put in place for a 90-day period, and it may be renewed or extended.

What are the consequences of the travel ban?

The president’s order suspends entry of all refugees for 120 days and specifically bars Syrian refugees indefinitely. It also imposes a 90-day suspension on citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. The order applies to all immigrants and nonimmigrants from those countries, including those with valid visas or green cards.

How has the travel ban been received?

Since the inception of Donald Trump’s travel ban, there has been a lot of confusion and controversy surrounding it. The ban, which prohibits citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States, has been met with protests, legal challenges, and unease from many people across the globe.

One of the main points of contention is whether or not the ban applies to green card holders. Initially, the ban did apply to green card holders, but this was later changed. As of now, the ban only applies to citizens of the seven countries who are trying to enter the United States for the first time. Green card holders from those countries will still be able to enter and exit the country as they please.

However, it’s important to note that green card holders may still be subject to extra scrutiny at airports and other entry points. They may also be required to undergo additional security measures, such as interviews or re-evaluations of their applications. So while the travel ban no longer outright bans green card holders from entering the country, it still makes it more difficult for them to do so.

There are a number of legal challenges to the travel ban. The ACLU has filed a lawsuit on behalf of green card holders who were prevented from boarding flights to the United States. The lawsuit argues that the ban violates their rights under the Constitution.

Other lawsuits have been filed by groups like the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) and the National Iranian American Council (NIAC). These lawsuits argue that the ban is discriminatory and violates the First Amendment’s guarantee of freedom of religion.

The ACLU has also filed a lawsuit challenging the executive order on behalf of two refugees who were detained at JFK airport. The lawsuit argues that the executive order violates their rights under the Constitution and federal law.

What is the future of the travel ban?

Currently, the travel ban is still in place and there is no indication that it will be lifted any time soon. The ban affects citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. It also puts a temporary stop to refugee resettlement from all over the world.

The ban has been met with a lot of opposition and multiple lawsuits have been filed against it. So far, the ban has been partially lifted by two different federal courts. However, the Trump administration has appealed these decisions and the ban is still technically in place.

What does this mean for green card holders? Although they are not directly affected by the travel ban, they may still experience difficulties when trying to travel to or from one of the seven banned countries. Green card holders who are also citizens of one of the affected countries may be subject to additional screening at airports or other ports of entry.

It is important to note that the travel ban is a fluid situation and it is subject to change at any time. If you are a green card holder who plans on traveling to or from one of the affected countries, it is advisable to stay up-to-date on the latest developments regarding the travel ban.

Conclusion

The revised travel ban does not explicitly exclude green card holders, but the Trump administration has said that it will not apply to them. In addition, the ban does not apply to those who have valid visas.

Further reading

– [Trump’s Executive Order on Refugees and Visa Holders](https://www. whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/01/27/executive-order-protecting-nation-foreign-terrorist-entry-united-states)
– [A comparison of the travel ban orders](http://www.cnn.com/2017/03/06/politics /trump-travel ban -orders/)

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