The EU’s Green List: Which Countries Can You Travel to Safely?

The EU has released a list of countries that are safe to travel to, based on their coronavirus infection rates. Here’s what you need to know about the list and which countries are included.

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The EU’s Green List: Why It Matters

The European Union (EU) has a list of countries that it has deemed safe for travel, and the list is updated regularly. The list is important because it determines which countries EU citizens can visit without having to quarantine when they return home.

The criteria for inclusion on the list are strict, and EU member states are required to adhere to them. In order to be included on the list, a country must have a similar or lower risk level than the EU average for COVID-19 transmission. In addition, the country must have a good surveillance system in place and be able to provide timely and accurate data on new cases.

The list is updated every two weeks, and countries can be added or removed at any time. Currently, there are only a handful of countries on the list, but the hope is that more will be added in the coming weeks and months.

If you’re planning a trip to Europe, be sure to check the list before you go to see if your destination is included. And remember, even if your country is on the list, you should still take precautions like wearing a mask and social distancing.

The EU’s Green List: How It Was Created

The EU’s “green list” of safe destinations for non-essential travel was created based on a set of strict criteria, including the rate of new Covid-19 cases, the percentage of the population that has been vaccinated, and the country’s ability to rapidly detect and contain new outbreaks.

Only countries with a low risk of transmission and good public health measures in place are included on the list. Travelers from green-listed countries will not be required to quarantine or undergo additional testing upon arrival in the EU.

The following countries are currently on the EU’s green list:

Albania
Andorra
Australia
Austria
Bahrain
Belgium
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Canada
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France

The EU’s Green List: What Countries Are Included

As of June 15, the European Union has released its list of countries that are safe for travel. This “green list” includes 14 countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay.

The list was determined based on a number of factors including the rate of infection of COVID-19, the country’s ability to contain the virus and the risk of outbreaks. Countries on the green list have a similar or lower risk than the EU when it comes to contracting the virus.

This list is subject to change as the situation surrounding COVID-19 continues to evolve. For example, if there is a surge in cases in one of the countries on the list, it may be removed. The EU is urging caution when traveling to any of these countries as there is still a risk of contracting COVID-19.

The EU’s Green List: What Countries Are Not Included

The EU’s Green List: Which Countries Can You Travel to Safely?

The European Union has released a list of countries that are safe to travel to, based on the risk of contracting Covid-19. The list is divided into three categories: green, orange, and red. Countries in the green category are those where the risk of contracting Covid-19 is low, and travelers from these countries will not be subject to any restrictions upon arrival in the EU. Orange countries are those where the risk of Covid-19 is higher, and travelers from these countries may be subject to additional measures such as quarantining upon arrival in the EU. Red countries are those where the risk of Covid-19 is very high, and travelers from these countries will not be allowed to enter the EU.

The EU’s Green List: Which Countries Are Not Included?

There are a number of countries that are not included on the EU’s green list. These include:
-Argentina
-Bangladesh
-Bolivia
-Brazil
-Cambodia
-Cameroon
-Canada
-China
-Colombia
-Ecuador
-El Salvador
Indonesia try this one next -> India (2) India (3) Iraq (4) Kuwait (5) Laos (6) Malaysia (7) Montenegro < – Montenegro was on page 2! also try Mexico next -> Mexico (2) Nepal (3) Panama Peru Philippines Russia Serbia South Africa South Korea Sri Lanka Switzerland Taiwan < – Taiwan was on page 2 Thailand < – Thailand was on page 2 Turkey < – Turkey was on page 2 United Arab Emirates United States of America Uruguay Venezuela Vietnam

The EU’s Green List: What It Means for Travelers

The EU has released a list of countries that are safe for travel, known as the “green list.” This list is updated every two weeks, and currently includes 15 countries.

This list does not include the UK or the US, but does include Canada, Japan, Rwanda, and Singapore.

For countries not on the green list, there is a risk assessment process in place that includes looking at the number of cases per 100,000 people, the percentage of people who have been vaccinated, and the number of new cases.

There is also a case-by-case basis for Travel to red-listed Countries. This includes things like work reasons, study reasons, or if you have family in the country.

The EU’s Green List: What It Means for the Travel Industry

The European Union (EU) has released a list of 15 countries that are considered safe for travel, based on their COVID-19 infection rates and other factors. The list will be updated every two weeks, and additional countries may be added as the situation changes.

This is good news for the travel industry, which has been hard hit by the pandemic. However, it’s important to note that the EU’s green list does not mean that all travel restrictions have been lifted. Each country on the list has its own entry requirements, and travelers will need to check these before they book any trips.

The EU’s green list includes:
-Australia
-New Zealand
-Rwanda
-Singapore
-South Korea
-Thailand
-Uruguay

The list is subject to change, so it’s important to check the latest advice before you travel. For more information, please visit the European Commission’s website.

The EU’s Green List: What It Means for the Future of Travel

The European Union has released its long-awaited “green list” of countries that are safe for travel, and the list includes some surprising choices.

The list, which was released on Wednesday, May 27, includes 15 countries that the EU believes are safe for travel: Australia, Canada, China, Cuba, Georgia, Japan, Kenya, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and Uruguay.

There are a few notable absentees from the list, including the United States (which is currently experiencing a surge in COVID-19 cases), as well as India and Brazil (both of which are currently dealing with major outbreaks).

The EU’s decision to include China on the list is especially notable, as relations between the EU and China have been strained in recent years due to disagreements over human rights and trade.

It’s important to note that the green list is not binding – meaning that each member state can choose whether or not to allow travelers from these countries to enter. So far, only a handful of countries have announced that they will be opening their borders to travelers from the green-listed countries. These include Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Greece.

The release of the green list is a sign that the EU is starting to think about how to safely reopen for travel after more than a year of lockdowni

The EU’s Green List: Pros and Cons

As the world slowly starts to reopen after months of lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic, people are starting to think about travel again. And while there are still many unknowns and risks when it comes to traveling during this time, the European Union (EU) has recently released a list of countries that are considered safe for travel.

The EU’s “green list” currently includes 15 countries — Albania, Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay — that have been deemed safe for travel based on their infection rates and public health measures.

However, while the list does offer some guidance on where it is safe to travel, there are also some things to consider before making any travel plans. Here are some pros and cons of traveling to a country on the EU’s green list:

Pros:
– You can feel confident that the country you’re visiting has a low risk of infection and is taking measures to keep visitors safe.
– You may be able to avoid quarantining upon arrival or upon return to your home country.
– You can be relatively confident that borders will not close while you’re in the country.

Cons:
– The green list is subject to change at any time — a country could be added or removed based on its infection rate or public health measures.
– Even if a country is on the green list, you may still be required to take precautions such as wearing a mask or social distancing.
– You may still need to quarantine upon returning home if your home country has different travel restrictions.

The EU’s Green List: What Other Countries Are Doing

The EU’s Green List: What Other Countries Are Doing

In an effort to keep the spread of COVID-19 under control, the European Union has released a list of countries that are deemed safe for travel. The list, which is updated every two weeks, currently includes 15 states and territories:

Australia
Canada
Georgia
Japan
Morocco
New Zealand
Rwanda
South Korea
Thailand
Tunisia
Uruguay
China (subject to reciprocity)
Algeria Montenegro Serbia Tunisia

If you’re planning on traveling within the EU, it’s important to note that while these countries are considered safe, you’ll still need to follow the necessary safety protocols such as wearing a mask and maintaining social distancing. You should also keep in mind that the situation can change quickly, so it’s always a good idea to check with your local authorities before making any plans.

The EU’s Green List: What’s Next

As the European Union looks to reopen for travel, it has released a list of 15 “safe” countries that travelers can visit without having to go into quarantine. The list is based on a number of factors, including the number of covid-19 cases, the rate of vaccination, and testing and contact tracing capabilities.

So far, the list includes Australia, Canada, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and Uruguay.The EU is also in talks with Israel and the United Arab Emirates about adding them to the list.

While the list is a step in the right direction, it’s far from perfect. There are concerns that it excludes countries with high numbers of covid-19 cases but low vaccination rates, such as India. There are also worries that it could lead to a two-tier system of haves and have-nots when it comes to international travel.

Only time will tell how well the EU’s green list works in practice. In the meantime, it’s important to remember that even if you are traveling to a “safe” country, you should still take precautions such as wearing a mask and social distancing.

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