Green Card Travel Dependents: What You Need to Know

If you have a Green Card and plan on traveling outside of the United States, it’s important to know the rules about taking your dependents with you. Here’s what you need to know to make sure your trip goes smoothly.

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Introduction

If you are a holder of a United States green card, also known as a permanent resident card, you may be wondering if you can bring family members with you when you travel. The answer is yes, but there are some things you should know before you try to do so.

First, it is important to understand that there are two types of travel documents for green card holders: the Green Card itself and the Advance Parole Document. The Green Card allows the holder to live and work permanently in the United States, while the Advance Parole Document allows the holder to travelling temporarily for business or pleasure. If you plan to travel outside of the United States with family members, it is important that everyone has both documents.

Second, it is important to know that not all family members will be eligible to travel with you on your green card. In order to be eligible, your family member must fall into one of the following categories:

-Spouse
-Unmarried child under the age of 21
-Unmarried adult child over the age of 21

What is a Green Card?

If you are a legal permanent resident of the United States, you will be issued a Green Card. Your Green Card allows you to live and work permanently in the United States. You can also apply for citizenship after five years. If you are married to a U.S. citizen or Green Card holder, or if you have another family member who is a citizen or Green Card holder, you may be eligible to apply for a Green Card as a dependent.

Who is eligible for a Green Card?

If you are a Green Card holder (permanent resident), you may travel outside the United States with your Green Card. However, if you travel outside the United States for an extended period of time, you will need to obtain a Reentry Permit. You will also need to show that you have maintained your residence in the United States, and that you intend to return to the United States as your primary place of residence.

If you are married to a Green Card holder, or if you have a child who is a Green Card holder, you may be eligible for a Green Card as a dependents. There are two types of dependents visas:
-Spouse visa (irrespective of marriage duration)
-Child visa (unmarried and below 21 years old)

How to apply for a Green Card?

If you are a legal permanent resident of the United States, you may be eligible to apply for a Green Card for your spouse or other family members. The process of applying for a Green Card is called “sponsorship,” and it can be a long and complicated process. But with the right information and preparation, it can be done.

The first step in sponsorship is to file an I-130 Petition for Alien Relative with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). This petition establishes the relationship between you and your relative. Once the petition is approved, your relative will be able to apply for a Green Card.

The next step is to file an I-485 Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status with USCIS. This application is used to adjust your relative’s current immigration status to that of a permanent resident. If everything is in order, USCIS will approve the application and your relative will be issued a Green Card.

It’s important to note that there are some limitations on who can apply for a Green Card through sponsorship. For example, immediate relatives of U.S. citizens (spouses, children under 21, and parents of citizens over 21) are given priority over other applicants. There are also annual limits on the number of Green Cards that can be issued through sponsorship. So it’s important to consult with an experienced immigration attorney before beginning the sponsorship process to make sure that you and your relative are eligible and that there is room for your application in the annual quota.

What are the benefits of having a Green Card?

There are many benefits of having a Green Card, including the ability to live and work permanently in the United States, the ability to travel freely in and out of the country, and the ability to sponsor family members for Green Cards.

What are the requirements for maintaining a Green Card?

To maintain a Green Card, you must meet certain requirements. You must:

-Live in the United States for at least 180 days out of each year
-File taxes in the United States
-Obey all U.S. laws
-Not be absent from the United States for more than 12 months total during any given year

What are the consequences of not complying with the requirements of a Green Card?

If you are a Green Card holder, you are required to comply with the terms and conditions of your status. Failure to do so can result in serious consequences, including the loss of your Green Card and your ability to travel.

If you are caught traveling without a Green Card, you may be detained by immigration authorities and deported back to your home country. You will also be placed on a list of people who are ineligible to return to the United States. In some cases, you may be able to apply for a waiver that would allow you to return to the United States; however, this is not guaranteed.

If you have been convicted of a crime or if you are suspected of engaging in terrorist activities, you will automatically lose your Green Card and be barred from returning to the United States.

What are the options for renewing or replacing a Green Card?

If your Green Card has been lost, stolen, or destroyed, you can apply for a replacement or renewal by filing Form I-90 with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). If your card has been lost or stolen, you may also need to file a police report.

You may also need to file Form I-90 if your Green Card has expired or will expire soon, or if you have been told by USCIS that you need to get a new card.

If you are a permanent resident who will be traveling outside the United States for more than one year, you will need to apply for a Reentry Permit on Form I-131. If you do not obtain a Reentry Permit before leaving the United States, you will need to apply for a new Green Card upon your return.

What if I lose my Green Card?

If you are a lawful permanent resident (LPR), you should carry your Green Card with you at all times. If you lose your Green Card, you should report it to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) immediately. You will need to file a form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card. There is a filing fee for this form. For more information, please see the USCIS website.

Conclusion

If you are a Green Card holder, you may want to consider bringing your family with you when you travel. Here is what you need to know about Green Card travel dependents:

Your spouse and unmarried children under the age of 21 can obtain a Green Card travel dependent card, which will allow them to travel with you.

Your dependent children over the age of 21 and your parents can get a Green Card travel authorization, which will allow them to travel with you but not live in the United States.

If you have any questions about bringing your family with you when you travel, be sure to consult an experienced immigration attorney.

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