Green Card Holders: Don’t Forget the Travel Document Fee!

Did you know that as a Green Card holder, you’re required to pay a travel document fee when returning to the United States after traveling abroad?

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What is the travel document fee?

The travel document fee is a $330 charge that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) imposes on some applicants for permanent residency (a “green card”). The fee is in addition to the other fees that USCIS charges for processing an application for permanent residency.

The travel document fee covers the cost of producing the physical green card, which is a plastic card that contains the holder’s name, photo, and other information. The fee also covers the cost of shipping the card to the applicant’s address.

USCIS charges the travel document fee for applications filed on or after July 30, 2007. USCIS may waive the fee for applicants who are unable to pay it.

The travel document fee is not refundable if USCIS denies an application for permanent residency.

Who needs to pay the travel document fee?

As of October 1, 2020, all new green card holders are required to pay a $220 travel document fee before traveling outside the United States.

This fee is in addition to the $535 application fee for the Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card.

If you are a new green card holder, you will need to pay the travel document fee if you plan to:
· Leave the United States and return as a permanent resident
· Receive a boarding foil (which allows you to board a commercial flight back to the United States)
· Renew or replace your green card while outside the United States

How much is the travel document fee?

All green card holders (permanent residents) must pay a $220 fee when applying for their travel document (green card). This fee is called the Travel Document Fee and is used to cover the cost of processing your application.

When is the travel document fee due?

The travel document fee is required for all new applicants for a Green Card. The fee is $165 and must be paid at the time of application. The fee is non-refundable and cannot be waived.

What happens if I don’t pay the travel document fee?

You may be issued a ticket without paying the travel document fee, but you will not be able to board the plane. If you don’t pay the fee when you’re issued your ticket, you’ll have to pay it at the airport before you can board.

How do I pay the travel document fee?

U.S. permanent residents (green card holders) who wish to travel outside the United States and return using their green card must pay a travel document fee. The fee is $200 and is valid for 10 years. It can be paid online or by mail.

What is the refund policy for the travel document fee?

Refunds for the travel document fee are available if you cancel your Green Card application within one year of payment. If you have already received your Green Card, the fee is non-refundable.

I have more questions about the travel document fee. Who can I contact?

The travel document fee is a mandatory fee assessed to all applicants for permanent residency (a “green card”). The current fee is $220. This fee is subject to change, so please check the USCIS website for the most up-to-date information.

Who is required to pay the travel document fee?
All applicants for permanent residency are required to pay the travel document fee. This includes applicants who are applying for a green card through adjustment of status as well as those who are applying for a green card through consular processing.

What is the purpose of the travel document fee?
The travel document fee covers the cost of processing and issuing your permanent resident card. USCIS uses the funds from this fee to pay for the printing of your green card, as well as related administrative costs.

How do I pay the travel document fee?
You can pay the travel document fee online, by mail, or in person at a USCIS office. Please see the USCIS website for instructions on how to pay the fee.

10 Tips for Green Card Holders Who Travel Abroad

If you’re a green card holder, you may travel outside the United States and return without applying for a new visa. However, there are a few things to keep in mind before you go.

Here are 10 tips for green card holders who travel abroad:

1. Be sure to carry your green card with you at all times. If you lose it or it is stolen, you will need to apply for a replacement from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

2. You will also need to carry a valid passport from your country of citizenship. If you do not have one, you should apply for one before you travel.

3. You will need to pay a travel document fee when you apply for your passport. This fee is currently $165 USD.

4. If your passport expires while you are abroad, you will need to renew it at a U.S. embassy or consulate before you can return to the United States.

5. You should also make sure that your green card is still valid before you travel. If it has expired, you will need to apply for a new one from the USCIS before you can return to the United States.

6. When you return to the United States, you will need to present your green card and passport to the Customs and Border Protection officer at the port of entry. You may be asked questions about your trip and why you are returning to the United States.
Answer honestly and be prepared to show any documentation requested by the officer such as hotel reservations or plane tickets..”

More Resources for Green Card Holders Who Travel Abroad

If you are a Green Card holder, you may be required to pay a travel document fee when traveling abroad. This fee is not required for U.S. citizens or for those with other types of visas.

The travel document fee is also known as theMachine-Readable Visa (MRV) fee. It is required for many first-time applicantsfor a U.S. visa, and it must be paid before your visa interview. The current MRVfee is $160, which must be paid in local currency.

There are a few exceptions to the travel document fee, so it’s important to check with your nearest U.S. consulate or embassy before you travel. For example, if you are applying for a diplomatic or official visa, you may be exempt from paying the MRV fee.

You can find more information about the MRV fee and how to pay it on the U.S. Department of State website .

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