Traveling with a Lost Green Card: What You Need to Know

If you find yourself traveling with a lost or stolen green card, there are a few things you should know. First and foremost, it’s important to remain calm and contact the nearest U.S. consulate or embassy as soon as possible. They will be able to help you replace your lost or stolen card and get you back on your way.

In the meantime, there are a few things you can do to make the process go as smoothly as possible. Be sure to have a

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Introduction

What should you do if you lose your green card while traveling outside the United States? If you are a lawful permanent resident (LPR) of the United States, also known as a “green card holder,” you may leave and return to the United States using your green card. However, if your green card is lost or stolen while you are traveling abroad, it is important to take some steps to replace it before returning to the United States.

The first step is to contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. The staff there can help you replace your lost or stolen green card and return safely to the United States. They may also be able to help if your green card was destroyed by a natural disaster or other emergency.

If you cannot contact a U.S. embassy or consulate, you can apply for a new green card through the U.S. Department of State’s (DOS) Emergency Replacement Passport program by following these steps:

Complete an Application for Replacement Permanent Resident Card (Form I-90). You will need to provide information about yourself and your current status in the United States. You will also need to provide proof of your identity and evidence that you are a lawful permanent resident of the United States.

Pay the I-90 filing fee. You can pay by check or money order made out to “Department of Homeland Security” or credit card ( Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover).
You will need two identical passport-style photographs taken within the last six months . Photographs must be 2 inches by 2 inches with a white background . You should write your name and “A-Number” (Alien Registration Number) on the back of one of the photographs . If you do not have an A-Number, you should include a statement explaining why not .
Include a copy of your travel itinerary with Form I-90 . Your itinerary should include dates of travel and confirmation numbers for flights, hotels , or other reservations .
Mail Form I-90 , photographs , filing fee , and itinerary to :

U.S Dept of State Permanent Resident Card Unit P o Box 120191 Dallas TX 75312-0191

Once DOS receives Form I-90 , they will review it and supporting documentation If everything is in order , DOS will issue an emergency replacement passport with limited validity . The limited validity passport is only good for direct return travel to the United States . Once you return , follow up with USCIS about getting a new permanent resident card .

What is a Green Card?

If you are a permanent resident of the United States, you have what is commonly known as a Green Card. A Green Card allows you to live and work permanently in the United States. The official name for a Green Card is Permanent Resident Card, or Form I-551.

If you have a Green Card and you travel outside the United States, it is important to keep your Green Card with you to show immigration authorities that you are allowed to return to the United States. If you lose your Green Card while you are outside the United States, it will be difficult for you to return to the United States.

There are two types of Green Cards:
-Conditional Permanent Resident status
-Unconditional Permanent Resident status

What Happens if You Lose Your Green Card?

As a permanent resident of the United States, you are issued a green card as proof of your status. If you lose your green card or it is stolen, you should report the loss or theft to the nearest U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) office as soon as possible. You will need to file a police report if your green card was stolen.

You will need to apply for a new green card, which can be done by mail or in person. The process and required documents are the same as if you were applying for a green card for the first time. You will need to submit photographs, fingerprints, and other required documents, as well as the application fee.

There is no fee to replace a lost or stolen green card if you are filing because of:
-A change in your legal name (due to marriage, divorce, etc.),
-A change in your citizenship status,
-Turning 14 years old (if your green card was issued when you were under 14),
-Turning 79 years old (if your green card was issued when you were 79 or older), or
-An error on your green card.

How to Replace a Lost Green Card

If you are a permanent resident of the United States and you have lost your green card, don’t panic. You can replace your green card relatively easily as long as you follow the proper steps and procedures. Here’s what you need to do:

1. File a report with the local police. This is important because you will need to include a copy of the police report when you file for a replacement green card.

2. Contact the nearest office of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). You will need to fill out and submit form I-90, Application for Replacement Permanent Resident Card.

3. Include the required fees with your I-90 form. The current fee for replacing a lost or stolen green card is $455.

4. Submit any additional required documentation along with your I-90 form, such as a copy of the police report or evidence that you have been a permanent resident for at least 5 years.

5.”https://www.uscis.gov/i-9-central/acceptable-documents/i-9-acceptable-documents” If you have everything in order, USCIS should process your application and issue you a new green card within 60 days.”

Tips for Traveling with a Lost Green Card

If you’ve lost your green card, there’s no need to panic. Here are a few tips for what to do:

1. Notify the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) as soon as possible. You can do this by filing a Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card.
2. Get a travel document from USCIS before you leave the United States. This will allow you to re-enter the country even if your green card is lost or stolen.
3. Be sure to keep a copy of your Form I-90 with you when you travel, along with any other supporting documents such as a passport or birth certificate.
4. If your green card is lost or stolen while you’re outside the United States, contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.
5. Remember that you’ll need to replace your green card if it expires while you’re outside the United States. You can do this by filing a new Form I-90 with USCIS.

What to Do if You Are Asked for Your Green Card While Traveling

If you are asked for your green card while traveling, it is important to know what to do. First, it is important to remember that a lost green card does not mean that you have lost your status as a lawful permanent resident. You can always apply for a new green card, but in the meantime, there are other options for travel documents that you can use.

If you are stopped by an immigration officer and asked for your green card, you should first ask if you can show some other form of identification. If the officer insists on seeing your green card, then you should ask to speak to a supervisor. It is possible that the officer was not aware that you could travel without a green card.

If the supervisor also insists on seeing your green card, then you should ask to speak to an attorney. You have the right to speak to an attorney at any time during the process. You may also want to file a complaint with the Department of Homeland Security if you feel that you have been treated unfairly.

What to Do if You Are Stopped by the Police Without Your Green Card

If you are a permanent resident of the United States, it is important to keep your Green Card with you at all times. However, if you are stopped by the police without your Green Card, there are certain steps you can take to protect your rights.

First and foremost, it is important to remain calm and be polite to the officer. You should not try to run away or hide from the police. If the officer asks for your name, address, and date of birth, you should provide this information. However, you are not required to provide any other information, such as your Social Security Number or where you were born.

The officer may also ask to see your passport or other identification. You should only show the officer your passport if it is easily accessible and if you feel comfortable doing so. If the officer asks to search your belongings, you have the right to refuse unless the officer has a warrant.

If the officer detained you for questioning, you have the right to remain silent and ask for a lawyer. It is important that you exercise these rights even if you have nothing to hide. Once again, it is crucial that you remain calm and polite throughout the process.

If the police arrest you, they must read you Miranda rights before they question you further about the incident. These rights include the right to remain silent and the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you by the court.

After your arrest, you will likely be taken into ICE custody for further questioning about your immigration status. During this time, it is important that you do not sign any documents or make any statements without first speaking with an attorney

What to Do if You Are Questioned by Immigration Officials

If you are questioned by immigration officials, you will need to show them your green card. If you do not have your green card with you, you will need to show them another form of identification, such as a passport or driver’s license. If you cannot show them your green card, they may detain you until they can verify your immigration status.

What to Do if You Are Arrested Without Your Green Card

If you’re a permanent resident of the United States (also known as a green card holder), it’s important to keep your green card with you at all times. However, if you find yourself in a situation where you are without your green card, there are still some steps you can take to ensure that your rights are protected.

If you are stopped by law enforcement and cannot produce your green card, the first thing you should do is ask to speak to your lawyer. You have the right to have an attorney present during any questioning, and it’s important that you exercise this right. If you don’t have a lawyer, you can ask for a list of free or low-cost legal service providers in your area.

It’s also important to know that even if you don’t have your green card with you, you still have certain rights under the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. This amendment protects against self-incrimination, and it gives everyone the right to remain silent when questioned by police. If you choose to exercise this right, be sure to do so calmly and politely.

Lastly, if you are arrested without your green card, it’s important to know that you have the right to contact your consulate or embassy. Under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, arrestees who are foreign nationals have the right to contact their consulate or embassy for assistance.

While it’s always best to carry your green card with you, if you find yourself in a situation where you are without it, remember these important steps to protect your rights.

Conclusion

If you are a permanent resident and have lost your green card, you should report the loss to the USCIS immediately. You will need to fill out a form, which you can find on the USCIS website, and submit it along with a new photo and fee. Once you have reported the loss of your card, the USCIS will mail you a replacement. In the meantime, you can travel using your passport from your home country as well as a photocopy of your lost green card.

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