US Green Card Holders – Know the Travel Rules

If you’re a US Green Card holder, it’s important to know the travel rules and regulations before you leave the country. Keep reading to learn more!

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Introduction

If you are a legal permanent resident of the United States (i.e. have a “green card”), you have the right to live and work here permanently. You also have the right to travel outside of the United States and return, as long as you follow certain rules.

As a green card holder, you should carry your green card with you at all times. You will need it to re-enter the United States after traveling abroad. If you are traveling by air, you will also need a valid passport from your country of citizenship.

You can generally stay outside of the United States for up to six months without jeopardizing your green card status. However, if you plan to be away for longer than six months, you may need to apply for a “reentry permit” before you leave. Without a reentry permit, you may not be allowed to reenter the United States.

If you are away from the United States for more than 12 months, but less than two years, and do not have a reentry permit, you may be allowed to enter if you can show that your absence was due to “extreme hardship” to yourself or a family member. If you are away for more than two years without a reentry permit or returning after being deported, you will need special permission from the U.S. government to return and will generally have to apply for a new green card once back in the United States.

If your green card is lost or stolen while you are outside of the United States, it is important that you contact the nearest U.S. consulate or embassy as soon as possible so that they can issue you a replacement card

Applying for a Green Card

You may apply for a Green Card (permanent residence) in one of the following ways:

· Through your family

You may be eligible to apply for a Green Card through your family if you have a relative who is a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, or if you have a relative who is a national of an eligible country. In order to apply through your family, you must complete and submit form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative.

· Through employment

You may be eligible to apply for a Green Card through employment if you have an offer of permanent employment in the United States and meet certain criteria. In order to apply through employment, you must complete and submit form I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker.

· Through asylum or refugee status

If you have been granted asylum or refugee status, you may be eligible to apply for a Green Card one year after your status has been granted. In order to apply, you must complete and submit form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status.

The Green Card Lottery

The official name of the Green Card Lottery is the Diversity Immigrant Visa Lottery. It is administered by the US Department of State, and is open to anyone who meets the eligibility requirements.

Those who are interested in applying for a Green Card through the lottery must first complete an online application. The lottery is held once a year, and randomly selects a certain number of people to receive Green Cards. If you are selected, you will be notified by mail, and will then need to complete additional paperwork in order to obtain your Green Card.

There are a few things to keep in mind if you are hoping to obtain a Green Card through the lottery. First, it is important to note that there are only a limited number of Green Cards available each year – so not everyone who applies will be selected. Additionally, it is important to be aware of the deadline for applying – if you miss the deadline, you will not be able to apply until the following year.

If you are selected as a winner in the lottery, it is important to remember that receiving a Green Card does not guarantee US citizenship. You will need to follow all the rules and regulations associated with being a Green Card holder, and renew your card every ten years. However, holding a Green Card does give you the right to live and work permanently in the United States – so it can still be a valuable asset.

Traveling on a Green Card

If you’re a green card holder, you’re allowed to travel freely within the United States. However, there are a few things to keep in mind if you’re planning on traveling outside of the country.

First, you’ll need to make sure that your green card is up to date. If it’s expired, you’ll need to renew it before you leave. Second, keep in mind that if you’re planning on staying outside of the United States for more than six months, you may be considered a resident of that country for tax purposes.

And finally, if you’re planning on traveling to a country that requires a visa for entry, be sure to apply for one well in advance of your trip. If you have any questions about travelling on a green card, be sure to speak with an immigration attorney.

Renewing or Replacing a Green Card

If you are a permanent resident of the United States, you will be issued a green card as evidence of your status. A green card allows you to live and work permanently in the United States. You will need to renew or replace your green card every 10 years.

You should renew your green card if:
-It has been lost, stolen, or damaged
-Your name has changed (or you have legally changed your gender)
-You need to update your information (such as your marital status or contact information)

You may replace your green card if:
-It was issued to you for only 2 years because of conditional permanent resident status, and you need to renew it before it expires
-It has expired and was issued to you for 10 years
-It was issued to you for more than 10 years and has been lost, stolen, mutilated, or destroyed

Losing or Damaging a Green Card

A Green Card holder who legally enters the United States is issued a permanent resident card, also known as a Green Card. The card is valid for 10 years for adults and 2 years for children under the age of 18. After this period, the card needs to be renewed.

Losing or damaging your Green Card can cause serious problems. It is important to keep your Green Card safe and in a good condition as it is proof of your legal status in the United State. Here are some things you should know about if you lose or damage your Green Card:

– If you lose your Green Card, you should report it to the nearest US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office as soon as possible. You will need to fill out form I-90 and pay a fee to replace your card.
– If you damage your Green Card, you can request a replacement by mail or in person at a USCIS office. You will need to fill out form I-90 and pay a fee to replace your card.
– If you are outside of the United States when your Green Card expires, you will need to contact the nearest US embassy or consulate to renew your card.

Traveling with a Green Card

If you are a permanent resident of the United States (a “green card” holder), you are free to travel in and out of the country as you please. However, there are a few things you should know before you travel:

-You must always carry your green card with you when you travel. You will need it to re-enter the United States after traveling abroad.

-If your green card will expire while you are abroad, you should renew it before you leave.

-If you are not a U.S. citizen, you may be required to get a visa before traveling to certain countries. Check with the embassy or consulate of the country (or countries) you plan to visit to find out if this is the case.

-You may be asked by immigration officials to show proof of your ties to the United States (such as a job, family, or property) when you return after traveling abroad. It is a good idea to have such proof with you when you travel, just in case.

Moving to Another Country with a Green Card

For those of you who already have a U.S. green card and are thinking of moving to another country, there are some things you need to know before you travel. Depending on how long you have had your green card, there are different travel rules that apply to you.

If you have had your green card for less than one year, you need to carry your I-551 permanent resident card with you when you travel outside the United States. If you are from one of the countries listed below, and are returning from a trip of less than 30 days, you may also bring your passport from your home country instead of your I-551 card.

Canada
Mexico
Adjacent islands (except Cuba)
The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
The Virgin Islands

If you have had your green card for longer than one year, but less than two years, and need to travel outside the United States for any reason other than pleasure (for example: work, study or medical treatment), you must carry with you both your passport and I-551 permanent resident card. You will need these documents when returning to the United States at the end of your trip.

Applying for U.S. Citizenship with a Green Card

U.S. citizenship grants a host of rights and protections, from the ability to vote and hold office to freedom from deportation. Green card holders, or legal permanent residents, may apply for U.S. citizenship after meeting a set of requirements set by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

The first step in applying for U.S. citizenship is to ensure that you meet the eligibility requirements. To be eligible, you must:

-Be 18 years or older
-Have been a green card holder for at least five years (or three years if you obtained your green card through marriage to a U.S. citizen)
-Have lived within your state or USCIS district for at least three months before filing your application
-Be able to demonstrate continuous residence in the United States for at least five years before filing (or three years if you obtained your green card through marriage to a U.S. citizen)
-Be able to demonstrate physical presence in the United States for at least 30 months out of the five years before filing (or 18 months out of the three years if you obtained your green card through marriage to a U.S. citizen)
-Be proficient in English (unless you qualify for an exemption based on age or disability)
-Pass a civics test demonstrating knowledge of U.S. history and government

10.Common Questions about Green Cards

1.What is a green card?
A green card, also known as a permanent resident card, is an identification card that proves that you have been granted permanent resident status in the United States.

2.Who is eligible for a green card?
There are many ways to qualify for a green card. You may be eligible through your family, your job, or your marriage to a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. You may also be eligible if you have been granted asylum or refugee status, or if you are a victim of certain crimes.

3.How do I apply for a green card?
The process of applying for a green card varies depending on your eligibility category. In general, you will need to fill out an application and submit it to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). You may also need to attend an interview and provide additional documentation.

4.How much does it cost to apply for a green card?
The cost of applying for a green card varies depending on your application category. For most categories, the filing fee is $535, plus an $85 biometrics fee (for fingerprinting and photos). There may also be other fees, such as the fee for attending an interview.

5.How long does it take to get a green card?
The amount of time it takes to get a green card depends on many factors, including which category you are applying under and whether you have attended your interview yet. The process can take anywhere from several months to several years.

6.What are the benefits of having a green card?
As a permanent resident of the United States, you will have many of the same rights and responsibilities as U.S citizens. This includes the right to live and work in the United States permanently, as well as the right to vote in certain elections (in most states). You will also be eligible for certain government benefits, such as Social Security retirement benefits and Medicaid health insurance benefits (in most states). However, there are some rights and benefits that are reserved for U.S citizens only, such as the right to run for elected office and the right to obtain certain government jobs (such as jobs with law enforcement agencies). Additionally, while you will not be required to serve in the military, you may be required to register with the Selective Service System if you are male and between the ages of 18 and 26 years old. Finally, please note that if you commit certain serious crimes or violate other terms of your permanent residency status, you can be deported from the United States back to your home country

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