What You’ll Need Besides Travel Documents While Awaiting Your Green Card

If you’re waiting for your green card, you’ll need more than just travel documents. Here’s what else you’ll need to make the most of your time.

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Applying for a Green Card

If you are applying for a green card, you will need more than just your travel documents. Be sure to have the following items with you when you go to your interview:

-Your birth certificate
-Your marriage certificate (if applicable)
-Your divorce decree or annulment papers (if applicable)
-Your children’s birth certificates (if applicable)
-Police certificates from any place you have lived in the past five years (if applicable)
-Military records (if applicable)
-School records (if applicable)

The Green Card Process

The Green Card Process is the process by which a foreign national becomes a permanent resident of the United States. There are a few different ways to obtain a Green Card, but the most common is through employment. If you have been offered a job in the United States, your employer will file a Petition for Alien Worker with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Once that petition is approved, you will be able to apply for a Green Card.

The process of applying for a Green Card can take several months, so it’s important to be prepared. In addition to your travel documents, you’ll need to bring:

– Your birth certificate
– Your passport
– Any other identity documents you have
– Your employment contract or offer letter
– Documentation of your education and qualifications
– Evidence of your English language ability (if required)
– A medical examination report

Traveling on a Green Card

You will need more than just your green card when you travel. You should also bring a valid passport from your country of citizenship. If you do not have a passport, you should contact your nearest consulate or embassy to obtain one. If you are a lawful permanent resident of the United States, you should also bring your I-94 Arrival/Departure Record.

Living in the United States on a Green Card

Living in the United States on a Green Card is an exciting proposition, but there are a few things you’ll need to take care of before you can fully enjoy your time here. In addition to your travel documents, you’ll need:

-A valid passport
-A Green Card
-Money for living expenses
-A place to live
-A job or another source of income
-Health insurance
-A way to get around (a car, bus pass, etc.)

Renewing or Replacing a Green Card

If your 10-year green card has expired, or will expire within the next 6 months, you should renew it. If your green card has been lost, stolen, or destroyed, or if you were issued a card valid for only 2 years because you obtained your initial green card through marriage to a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, and that marriage ended within 2 years of your acquiring the card, you should replace your card.

You may file for a renewal or replacement Green Card (Form I-90) as early as 6 months before your card expires. It is important to renew or replace your Green Card before it expires because if it does expire, you may be considered unlawfully present in the United States.

To renew or replace your Green Card, you must file Form I-90 with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). If you are outside the United States when USCIS issues your new Green Card, we will mail it to the U.S. embassy or consulate where you applied for a immigrant visa. You can then pick up your Green Card at that location after you return to the United States.

Giving Up a Green Card

If you have a green card and want to give it up, you should follow these steps:

1. Send a written request to the USCIS office that approved your green card. Include your full name, date and place of birth, current address, and alien registration number (A-number).

2. Include a copy of your green card.

3. Mail your request by certified mail with return receipt requested, or hand-deliver it to the USCIS office. If you hand-deliver it, keep a copy of your green card and the receipt showing the date you delivered your request.

4. The USCIS office will review your request and may ask you to come in for an interview. At the interview, an immigration officer will ask you questions to confirm that you understand the implications of giving up your green card.

5. If the officer approves your request, he or she will endorse your green card as ” voluntarily surrendered for cancellation.” The officer will then give you a document called “Notice of Approval of Request for Voluntary Relinquishment of Lawful Permanent Resident Status.” Keep this notice with your records. It is proof that you are no longer a permanent resident alien of the United States.

Immigration Options for Green Card Holders

If you are a green card holder, you have several options available to you for immigrating to the United States. You can apply for a family-sponsored green card, an employment-based green card, or a green card through the Diversity Lottery Program. You will also need to meet certain requirements, such as having a valid passport and being admissible to the United States.

What to Do If Your Green Card Is Lost or Stolen

If your green card is lost or stolen, you will need to obtain a replacement as soon as possible. To do this, you will need to file a petition with the USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration Services).

In order to file a petition, you will need to provide the following documentation:
-A copy of your birth certificate
-A copy of your passport
-A copy of your green card (if you have one)
-A copy of your marriage certificate (if applicable)
-A copy of your divorce decree (if applicable)
-Evidence of your residency in the United States

Resources for Green Card Holders

If you are awaiting your green card, there are a few things you will need in addition to your travel documents. Firstly, you will need to have a valid form of identification, such as a passport, driver’s license, or government-issued ID. You will also need to have proof of your current immigration status, such as an I-94 form or an I-797 form. Finally, you will need to show proof of your pending green card application, such as an I-485 form or an I-130 form. With these documents in hand, you should be able to navigate the process of awaiting your green card with relative ease.

Frequently Asked Questions About Green Cards

What is a Green Card?
A Green Card allows an individual to live and work permanently in the United States. Once you have been issued a Green Card, you do not have to renew it. You can travel outside of the United States and re-enter using your Green Card. There are two types of Green Cards: immigrant and nonimmigrant.

What is an immigrant Green Card?
An immigrant Green Card is issued to foreign nationals who have been granted permission to live permanently in the United States. To be eligible, individuals must either have an employer sponsor them, or be related to a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

What is a nonimmigrant Green Card?
A nonimmigrant Green Card is issued to foreign nationals who are coming to the United States temporarily for work, study or other reasons. To be eligible, individuals must have a sponsor, such as an employer, school or family member in the United States.

Do I need a Green Card to enter the United States?
If you are a citizen of a country that participates in the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), you do not need a visa to enter the United States for tourism or business purposes for 90 days or less. If you are not a citizen of a country that participates in the VWP, you will need a visa to enter the United States. For more information on visas, please visit our website at www.travel.state.gov/visa/.

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